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The Label Doesn’t Apply

On a beautiful spring day, I was wearing a prolife T-shirt emblazoned with the words “I protect babies. What’s your superpower?”

As I was walking down the sidewalk, a young lady raced past me. Then she stopped, turned, and asked me what my T-shirt meant.

In a notoriously liberal city, I cautiously replied that I wanted to protect babies in the womb and mothers who face an unplanned pregnancy. She looked rather smug and proclaimed, “I’m pro-choice.”

I hoped to engage her in further conversation, but I didn’t need to say a word. Without taking a breath, she said, “I believe that when a woman finds herself pregnant, she should be responsible for that child. She can raise the child or put it up for adoption.”

Interesting.

She continued to talk about how girls need to be careful when they have sex, because sex can lead to pregnancy and that comes with a lot of responsibility.

Interesting.

She then proudly announced that a doctor had told her to abort her baby. Although warned that her child would be born with many health problems, she gave birth to her daughter, who is now eight years old and perfectly healthy.

I laughed happily and said, “Sweetie … you’re not pro-choice. You’re pro-life!”

She stared at me, not knowing what to say, and then proceeded to walk away.

Perhaps she was raised in a pro-choice home and simply accepted her family’s viewpoint that it is “a woman’s right to choose.”

Perhaps she attended a school and mindlessly agreed with her teachers and her friends as they supported “reproductive rights.”

Or perhaps as part of her community culture she always voted Democrat and just accepted being an advocate for abortion as part of the party platform.

Either way, she self-identified as pro-choice, but acted and held similar beliefs to every pro-life person I knew.

Sometimes the best that we can do is wear a T-shirt, plant a seed, and help others come to the realization that they are pro-life … they have simply been holding on to a label that really doesn’t apply.